A 410 Gone is an HTTP status code representing a permanently deleted internet resource, useful for website management and SEO strategies. Further on, we delve into its meanings, best practices, and tips for understanding 410 done.

What is 410 gone?

A 410 gone error message is an HTTP status code communicated by a server to denote that the requested webpage or URL has been permanently deleted and is not expected to be revived in the future. The message stands as a sort of dead-end for visitors ensuring them that they cannot retrieve the desired content.

410 gone plays an integral role in the scheme of HTTP status codes, which are delivered by a server as a response to a client request. Unlike the more frequent 404 not found error, which suggests that the server couldn’t locate the requested URL but doesn’t imply a permanent termination, a 410 gone status definitively labels the content as unobtainable indefinitely.

In the realm of SEO and digital marketing, the handling of such status codes is critical. They impact how your website communicates with search engines and influence your site’s crawlability, indexing, and overall user experience.

Why is 410 gone important?

The 410 gone error is fundamental in SEO practices for its crucial role in the maintenance and crawlability of your website.

Enhances user experience

By correctly implementing the 410 gone status, website owners can effectively guide users and search engines away from non-existent pages and navigate them towards relevant, existing content. This prevention of frustration escalates user satisfaction and engagement on your site.

Efficient indexing

Correct utilization of 410 gone status helps with efficient indexing of your site by search engines. Search engine robots will understand that the content has been permanently removed and thus, cease efforts to crawl and index the URL, allowing them to focus on the functioning parts of your website instead.

Prevents wasted server resources

Recurrent crawling of a non-existing page by search engines depletes server resources. By leveraging the 410 gone status, you can effectively communicate the unavailability of the content and conserve server resources.

Types of 410 gone

410 gone can be issued manually or automatically depending on the server’s configuration and platform used for website hosting.

Manual 410 gone errors are implemented by website administrators when a specific page or URL requires termination. Automatic 410 gone errors are initiated by web servers when certain conditions, often predefined, are met. These could include a hit on a URL that hasn’t existed for a set period or access to a file that has been deleted from the server’s records.

Examples of 410 gone

Manual application

An SEO professional may decide to deprecate a webpage containing outdated information. The 410 gone status is manually applied to the concerned URL indicating its permanent removal.

Automated deletion

A cloud hosting service may automatically apply a 410 gone status to files deleted from its storage after a certain retention period. This would prevent users from accessing non-existent files.

Website migration

During website migration, a 410 gone status could be applied to pages that are intentionally not transferred to the new website structure. This would prevent search engines from trying to index non-migrated pages.

Useful tips about 410 gone

Understanding and properly implementing the 410 gone status is crucial for efficient website management. Here are some tips:

Apply wisely

Only use 410 gone for permanently deleted content. If content is temporarily unavailable, consider using other HTTP status codes.

Use redirections

If a deleted page has a similar or replacement page, redirect users and search engines to that page using 301 redirect. It enhances user experience and retains any SEO value the old URL had.

Check with webmaster tools

Ensure that your 410 gone status codes are working as intended by using webmaster tools provided by search engines like Google Search Console.

Conclusion

A 410 gone status code informs users and search engines that a webpage or a URL has been permanently deleted. It plays a crucial role in user experience, efficient indexing of websites, and the conservation of server resources. Application of 410 gone can be either manual or automatic.

Examples of 410 gone status code include manual application when deprecating a webpage, automatic deletion by cloud hosting services, and during website migration. The tips for understanding and applying 410 gone include judicious use, employing redirections for deleted pages with similar or replacement ones, and double-checking its functionality with webmaster tools.

Efficient website management and improved SEO rankings are closely linked to understanding and properly implementing 410 gone. Therefore, it’s essential to grasp its importance and utility.

Upgrade your website's performance

Maximize user satisfaction, improve indexing efficiency, and optimize your website's overall performance with URLsLab's powerful features. Try it today and take your website to the next level!

Get the WordPress plugin
Upgrade your website's performance

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between 404 not found and 410 gone?

404 not found suggests that the server could not locate the requested URL but does not indicate permanency of deletion, while 410 gone says the content has been intentionally permanently deleted and will not return.

When should I use 410 gone status code?

Use 410 gone when you have permanently deleted a page or a URL and you don’t plan on bringing it back. If the deletion is temporary, consider other HTTP statuses like 404 not found.

How does 410 gone impact SEO?

410 gone status code enables search engine bots to understand that a page has been permanently deleted, hence, should not be crawled or indexed. This leads to better conservation of server resources and enhances the efficiency of website indexing.

Back to Glossary Create account for FREE
Search engine poisoning, SERP features, SSL, and UGC link attribute are essential for SEO. Website authority, voice search, and white-hat SEO are also crucial.

Y

Search engine poisoning, SERP features, SSL, and UGC link attribute are essential for SEO. Website authority, voice search, and white-hat SEO are also crucial.

SEM, SERPs, SSL, SEO, UGC, and more are essential for website visibility and performance. Understanding these concepts is crucial for effective digital marketing.

X

SEM, SERPs, SSL, SEO, UGC, and more are essential for website visibility and performance. Understanding these concepts is crucial for effective digital marketing.

Search engine poisoning, SERP, SEO, SSL, UGC, and Voice search are some key terms in the extensive list of SEO-related terms.

Q

Search engine poisoning, SERP, SEO, SSL, UGC, and Voice search are some key terms in the extensive list of SEO-related terms.

Search engine poisoning, SERPs, SSL, SEO, UGC, Voice search, Website authority, White-hat SEO, YMYL pages, and more are essential for website optimization.

H

The text covers a wide range of SEO-related topics, from search engine results to technical aspects like SSL and TLS. It also touches on website authority, webspam, and white-hat SEO.

Experience next-level SEO plugin

Get started today and download the URLsLab Wordpress plugin

Download the plugin
Experience next-level SEO plugin